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Sunday, 8 March 2015

KohuKohu and Beyond

Last week we made a little trip to one of my favourite places in the North of New Zealand - Kohukohu, Hokianga. At one stage this sleepy little river village was one of the biggest towns north of Auckland, in the days when the river was used for transportation of timber. Milling was the main industry then, with dairying being next. Unfortunately a lot of the historic buildings have been lost to fires over the years. The current population is approximately 150.

Hokianga Harbour from Kohukohu

And looking back at Kohukohu
Historic wooden buildings, still lived in, Kohukohu




Derek had work to do, so I went for a village wander with my art stuff. As I meandered up the hill, I could hear the sound of the children in school performing Kapa Haka (Maori song and dance). It echoed through the village as I walked, like a beautiful soundtrack.

Masonic Hall in foreground, Lavender Cottage (B 'n' B) behind



The main way to get to Kohukohu, other than a long drive, is across the river from Rawene by car ferry. For our return trip we raced to get to the ferry landing in time - just to see the ferry pull out, almost fully laden with vehicles. We watched, thinking we would have a bit of a wait, only to see the ferry stop, then reverse back in to pick us up. Only in the Hokianga, we thought, would that happen.
I've put in a few photos from other little villages on the way home, I hope you enjoy them.

Cute little handcrafted caravan spotted in a craft shop


view from the craft shop/cafe window, Rawene

Colourful paint work in Rawene

Derek chatting to the store owner and a customer in Waimamaku 

Not a lot going on at this petrol station, Waimamaku

Cool little Op shop and cafe next door, Waimamaku

"Tane Mahuta" (Giant Kauri tree) in Waipoua Forest, with Derek in foreground to give some perspective

3 comments:

  1. I love the architecture and the lovely names. I have to say them out loud as I am reading them because I know I'm going to like the way they sound. The little fabric caravan is so clever with its tv antenna and festive pennants.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for your comments Cynthia. Some of our Maori place names are not easy to pronounce, but they do sound poetic.

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    2. Thanks for your comments Cynthia. Some of our Maori place names are not easy to pronounce, but they do sound poetic.

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